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Filed in:Cycling
Adventures

Glacier & Waterton Lakes Cycle Tour

August 22nd, 2005  · stk

In 1932, the adjoining Glacier National Park (Montana, U.S.A.) and Waterton Lakes National Park (Alberta, Canada) were combined to form the first International Peace Park, celebrating the peace and friendship between these two countries. In 1995, the Peace Park was recognized as a World Heritage Site.

What better place for a 350-mile loop cycle adventure for a U.S./Canadian couple and their 22-month-old, dual-citizenship daughter?

The area has stunning views of glacier-carved, snowcapped mountains, cascading waterfalls, lush alpine meadows blanketed in colorful wildflowers, rolling prairies with farms and ranches, wildlife, including big horn sheep, grizzlies and deer, crystal clear running streams and rivers, and green forested mountains. The weather includes hot (85°F) days under bright, sunny and cloudless skies. Storms roll through fast and there can be cold, wet days in down pouring rain. The terrain offers thrilling downhill runs and laboriously slow, uphill slogs. The cycling climax, in Glacier National Park: the "Going to the Sun Road" over Logan's Pass. This 50-mile road is an engineering feat, offering stunning and scary views along its windy and narrow route.

Follow along on our cycling adventure, which Rachel diligently documented and Scott has edited and optimized for web-accessibility.

We hope that you enjoy the story and find it useful in planning your adventure.

 

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Filed in:Cycling
Adventures

Icefields Parkway Tour

September 9th, 2004  · stk

In early August, we packed up the bikes and Oop's tow trailer, headed south, and cycled from Canmore, through Banff & Jasper National Parks, along the Icefield Parkway. It was about a 300 km trip, which took us 5 days to complete. We were worried about Alex and how she would adjust to cycle-touring. We needn't have worried, because she adjusted just fine, as she normally does.

This was our only summer adventure, packed tightly between our big Edmonton move & the start of Rachel's nursing program at the Univeristy of Alberta. We nearly didn't go, because Scott felt there were too many things that needed doing before winter set in. Rachel put her foot down & said she was going to go anyway. "We need to do something this summer. We didn't do anything last summer, because I was pregnant and we won't have much of a chance to go anywhere during the 2 years I'm in the nursing program," she argued. You know what? When she's right - she's right. Scott capitulated and is very glad he did.

We had a great time. Though we started the trip with rain, the sun came out and great weather prevailed all week. The scenery was simply awesome. Alex enjoyed camping and was the talk of the town, as we received lots of kudos from fellow cyclists & auto tourists alike. She adjusted to camping more readily than we adjusted to her getting dirty (it took a couple of days before we stopped fretting every time she headed for a dusty patch). In the end, we learned to relax & though Alex was dirtier, she was happy!

Rachel kept a wonderful journal of our trip and it's posted in on a cycle-touring web site, along with a short slide show.

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Updated: 4-Aug-2008
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PCT Slideshow

August 8th, 2004  · stk

Two years after we hiked 2,560-miles from Mexico to Canada along the PCT, Scott finalized the online slide show. We have added LOTS of new photos and they've all been modified to show at a higher resolution. Click HERE to see pictures and information about our 5-month long wilderness adventure. It was the experience of a lifetime!

Note: Our slide show is currently a Java applet, so make certain that you have the latest version of Java and that you have javascripting turned on in your browser.

(Scott has been motivated by Tom & Sheila, who've almost finished hiking the length of California. They're headed to Seiad Valley this week). We've been reading their online journal, which brings back memories of our 5-month-long hike. Just the motivation to get that slide show finished!

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Updated: 22-Feb-2006
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The Medan Bus

May 8th, 1986  · stk

My first post in the "hisstory" category, this article discusses the road hazards one might come across in the Aceh Province of northern Sumatra, in Indonesia. I supervised two remote jungle seismic crews (over 1000 men on each crew) for two years, from 1985-1987, while working for Mobil Oil Indonesia. I kept a journal of my experience and am finally getting around to getting some of it posted.

Driving Hazards of Northern Sumatra
Both Real & Imagined

About This Article

 mobil oil logo

For two years, from 1985 to 1987, Scott worked for the Field Operations Group for Mobil Oil, based out of Jakarta, Indonesia. He was the company geophysicist, working in the remote jungle region of the Aceh Province, at the northern tip of Sumatra, supervising two helicopter-supported, remote-jungle seismic crews. Each crew was made up of over 1,000 men. During this time, a National Geographic photographer visited and some of those photos are included in the August, 1989 National Geographic article "The Quest for Oil".

This journal entry was made during Scott's first 2-month tour (Scott worked a 2-month "on", 1-month "off" schedule and when he was "on" he worked from 6 AM till 6 PM, 7 days a week.

The journal topic for tonight is "Driving Hazards".

There are many driving hazards in northern Sumatra (Note: I am only talking about the driving hazards in the countryside. So far, I have little experience driving on the roadways of Indonesian cities, but from the little bit I have experienced - it's a constant hazard! Avoid city driving if you can!).

We have paid drivers that do all our driving for us. This is mostly keep us foreigners out of trouble. If an accident occurs, no matter who is at fault, all fingers (by mutual agreement) point to the "orang puti" (white man). He is the one with the most money! The police will back-up this policy. (Graft is alive and well).

Sometimes it's nice to have drivers, but it is hard to be a passenger in a car when you're sitting in the drivers seat! (Indonesians drive on the left-hand side of the road and because of this, most steering wheels are on the right side of the vehicle. "On the passenger's side," is where I describe the location of the steering wheel, to all those that will listen.) As a passenger, I am always - out of habit - trying to sit on the passenger's side of the vehicle, which is the driver's seat in Indonesia. All of our drivers think this is really funny.

Aceh Road Hazards

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